Cultural Artifacts: My Personal Collections of the Old, Awesome, and Weird

A scholar from China visiting the University of Houston has been sitting in on my Saturday class. She brought this bookmark to me about three weeks ago.  I got this heavy paper weight/book holder around 2005 at a small bookstore going out of business.  Found these antique glass marbles in Abilene, Texas, in the attic atContinue reading “Cultural Artifacts: My Personal Collections of the Old, Awesome, and Weird”

What you don’t know about restaurant surveys, plus a word to restaurant owners.

I enjoy cooking, but I enjoying eating out more. I enjoy eating out because except for teaching, I am only “out and about” when eating out. Eating at restaurants provides opportunities to see other people and enjoy really tasty, hot food. I live on Chick-fil-A, El Chico, Panera, and Red Lobster! (I just wish it weren’tContinue reading “What you don’t know about restaurant surveys, plus a word to restaurant owners.”

Career Day at Alvin Junior High School!

Today I had the privilege of talking with eight groups of twenty 8th graders at Alvin Junior High School. My day was a blast! These students were curious and have a love of life far too many adults have lost. They were eager and fully innocent of all the things that stress far too many adults. TheyContinue reading “Career Day at Alvin Junior High School!”

A Case Study Looking at the Rhetoric of Journalism Bias: Structure, Photography, Voice, and Events at the University of Oklahoma

They say good journalism is free from (overt, excessive) biases. Such standards are impossible, without even considering the personal interests of a writer. The rhetoric of an article, even when seemingly balanced, helps speak to the “true” agendas–conscious or unconscious–of the author. What kind of pictures are included? Who is given a specific voice inContinue reading “A Case Study Looking at the Rhetoric of Journalism Bias: Structure, Photography, Voice, and Events at the University of Oklahoma”

Call to Action: Research Papers – Teaching African American History Update #4

My students are beginning to really focus in on their argumentative research papers for the semester. They have the option to write on anything that is in anyway related to Black History. I asked them to post a quick blog about their topic with an outline of some sources they plan to use so far.Continue reading “Call to Action: Research Papers – Teaching African American History Update #4”

Primary Sources: History, Ethics, and Commodities

Several aspects of the historian’s general treatment of traditional historical documents has occupied significant mental energy lately. Items such as letters are generally not meant to be read by audiences en masse (or sold). Anne Frank’s diary was also not intended to be read by audiences (or sold by publishers) around the world (and was certainlyContinue reading “Primary Sources: History, Ethics, and Commodities”

Texas Independence Day, Timelines, and Privilege

Today is Texas Independence Day. Woohoo, right? Well, not so fast.  Texas Independence was accomplished through deaths and injuries on both sides and ideas of superiority on both sides, although especially on the Texian side with their ideologies from the United States that would soon officially be named Manifest Destiny. In the aftermath of the TexasContinue reading “Texas Independence Day, Timelines, and Privilege”

Why isn’t there a White History Month?!!

I have previously addressed arguments related to the strengths and weakness of Black History Month here. Until now, however, I have not addressed one of the number one questions asked, especially in February and March, and that is, “Why isn’t there a White History Month?” The simplest answer is that every month, every week, every day,Continue reading “Why isn’t there a White History Month?!!”